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An observing and logical "Father" writes to the Nation apropos President Porter's report with its accompanying theories of paternal college government. We commend his points to anxious fathers generally. This is his eminently sensible argument: "If my son can, whereever I send him, do with his evenings in a college building, or who knows where else, what he chooses, and with all the time he spends in his own room or anybody else's what he chooses, in what important particular are his morals safer under the most than under the least paternal of college governments?" This correspondent's postscript is so vigorous and pertinent in its statement that it is worth quoting entire: "What, in particular, does President Porter mean by the faculty's providing for 'attractive amusements and athletic activities?' You cite the phrase, and the alliteration makes it a noticeable one. But athletic activity is, we should suppose, quite out of the line of most of those who are called upon to take it in charge. Then, again, though the faculty at Yale may at rare intervals afford the students amusements, to ask them, or any other faculty to undertake the business of providing regularly attractive amusements, is no joke."

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