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The question of civil service reform in our national politics is certainly one of the leading topics of the day. At Harvard, as well as at other colleges, there are undoubtedly many whose interest in the subject is sincere and earnest, and who are very willing to aid the cause in any way in their power. At one college, we understand, there is already a civil service reform among the students, and at Princeton the project of forming one is now being agitated. There would seem to be no reason why this movement should not spread throughout all the colleges of this country, and why its agitation and promotion should not be undertaken directly by college men. Of course there are many whose views on the reform are doubtful or who are professedly opposed to it; but it should be the aim of others to convert such opponents to their own faith. At Harvard especially, where so great an interest is taken in all historical and economic studies, the formation of such an association would seem especially advisable and its prospects for success particularly bright. Participation in practical politics is certainly the duty of all educated men, and in this matter especially their efforts might be most appropriately put forth.

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