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While the topic is yet fresh it may fitly be remarked that this is not the first occasion on which Harvard College has been creditably identified with a general observation of the transit of Venus. On the occasion of the transit of 1874 the phenomenon was not visible here, but in respect to the previous transit in 1769, and so to speak, its companion of 1761, Harvard has an honorable record. The college had no observatory then and but a meagre supply of instruments, but what were at command did good service. There was no observatory in this country at that time nor for a long while afterward, and that Harvard College stands out as a pioneer in the matter of cis-Atlantic transit-observation is due to John Winthrop, who, at the time referred to, was Hollis professor of mathematics and natural philosophy. In giving an account of this experience, Josiah Quincy, in his history of Harvard College, characterizes this professor as "one of its brightest ornaments." - [Advertiser.

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