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Oberlin, the home of the truly good, finds time in the midst of its deadly strife with a corner drug store, to say a kind and cheering word for Eastern colleges. Now, is not the following from the Oberlin Review, really admirable and charitable? "Our Eastern exchanges are discussing the prejudice that exists in Western colleges against those in the East, and it becomes a question of interest to us whether it is not true that our notions of these Eastern institutions are not somewhat hazy, and whether we do not have an exaggerated idea of the freaks and follies of the students in the older colleges. There is but little doubt that we Westerners do not properly appreciate the work done at Yale and Amherst and Harvard, and we are too liable to assume from instances that we have heard or known that boys, as a rule, go to these places to have a good time, and that but little work is done. Dissipation, athletic sports, frivolity of all sorts, we fancy, is the business of an Eastern college man. Now this is unjust, and a candid student will not be prejudiced by suoh views." Dissipation, athletic sports, frivolity of all kinds - bless us, what a Satanic trio! And we have been guilty of such things.

But the good Review is even more generous yet: "The older colleges have a larger proportion of loafers. But this is not the fault of the colleges. Western colleges have less of this disturbing element now, but as they grow they will meet with the same difficulties. Indeed, some of our Western schools are even now passing the Eastern colleges in these unsatisfactory elements, and Ann Arbor, Northwestern and Oberlin may well congratulate themselves if, when they are as old as Harvard and Williams and Amherst, they turn out as fine gentlemen, as keen scholars and as earnest Christians. On this side the Alleghanies there are fewer appliances for study, little money and less experience. On the other side there is an abundance of means, and more temptations, greater dangers. But the difference is growing less each year. The West is advancing rapidly, and the 'freshwater' schools are beginning to draw away students from the 'old salts.' The fair-minded student East or West will see that in this brotherhood of colleges there is no place for jealousy, and the Western depreciation of Eastern colleges is as absurd as the more frequent and ignorant sneer of the Eastern undergraduate at Western institutions."

The athletic season may be fairly said to have opened yesterday. With the return of springlike weather the opportunity for out-door work is eagerly taken advantage of, and the change from the monotony of the gymnasium routine is fully enjoyed. Jarvis and Holmes will soon be lively with the practising nines and various teams of cricket, lacrosse and tennis players. The curious will now find amusement in going to the boat-house and seeing the Class and 'Varsity crews. Bicyclers, too, will soon be able to enjoy their rides over smooth, hard roads, and those fond of pedestrian jaunts in the surrounding country have already had several pleasant days on which to indulge their fancy. Unless there is an unexpected change in the weather we may hope for a speedy activity among the lovers of athletic sports.

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