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At the meeting of the overseers on Wednesday the question of admitting women to the Harvard Medical School was discussed and voted upon. A report on the subject was presented from a special committee, embodying the views of the faculty of the school: "The faculty," says the Advertiser's report of the meeting, "while making no opposition to the medical education of women in general, decidedly oppose it in the Harvard Medical School. The school, they say, was founded for the medical education of men, and has been endowed and sustained for that purpose-a purpose which would be seriously perverted if the school were changed into an institution for the education of both sexes alike. The faculty has been trying to raise the standard of medical education, and has already made it higher than anywhere else in America. The examinations are harder, and the course of instruction is more complete and thorough and more distinctly graded than in any other university in the country. Beginning with anatomy, the course ends in the third and fourth years with more abstruse subjects. The fourth year is still voluntary, but an effort is being made to extend the regular course. The school and the faculty have now all they can do, and are doing all that the community can ask of them; and all that they are doing is directly in the line of raising the standard of medical education and educating students to be good physicians. The addition of a mass of women to the students would probably result either in seriously deranging the machinery of the school, or the standard of the school and of medical education would have to be lowered to the capacity of the many." Resolutions accompanied the report embodying the above views. Eighteen of the medical faculty concurred in this report and from it two dissented. The following vote was then adopted by the overseers:

Voted, That in the opinion of the board it is not advisable for the university to give any assurance, or hold out any encouragement that it will undertake the medical education of women of Harvard College in the medical school.

The vote, which may fairly be regarded as significant of the attitude of members of the board of overseers towards many similar propositions as well, stood: Yea-William Amory, William C. Endicott, Richard M. Hodges, Edward W. Hooper, Theodore Lyman, Robert M. Morse, Jr., Henry W. Paine, Francis E. Parker, Le Baron Russell, Stephen Salisbury, Leverett Saltonstall, Robert D. Smith-12. Nay-Phillips Brooks, James Freeman Clarke, Charles W. Elliot, Henry P. Kidder, Alexander McKenzie, John T. Morse, Jr., Francis G. Peabody, John T. Sargent, Edwin P. Seaver, Moorefield Storey, Morrill Wyman-11. The final decision of the question rests with the corporation. "Of the seven persons who form the corporation," says the Advertiser, "only two are thought to favor the medical education of women at Harvard." Co-education of any sort with us must now undoubtedly be but a dream for the dim future!

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