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The action of the faculty in reference to the nine, while it certainly shows great consideration and forethought for the athletic interests of the college, cannot but bring home forcibly to every one the misfortune of the present regulation by which the nine is forbidden to play professional teams on the home grounds. By this regulation the men are really compelled to go to New York in order to find a good team with which to obtain practice. If the authorities will repeal this decree professional clubs can be invited, and will gladly accept, to play the 'Varsity in Cambridge, and in this way the best interests of all will be subserved; for while there may be well founded objections to playing professional teams, their conduct has always been found as gentlemanly and respectable as that of amateurs.

There seems to be no end to the muddle at Dartmouth College over President Bartlett: "It is matter of common knowledge," says the Post, "that the feeling over this question has become very deep, and that it has quite destroyed the old kindly, social life at Hanover, though it is not allowed to reach the students, and ostensibly everything is quiet. The only place where the contest can be fought out is in the board of trustees. We infer the majority think President Bartlett will live the opposition down and weary the alumni into indifference and subsequent forgetfulness, but we think they under-estimate the strength of their opposition. No college, and especially such a college, remote from the great centres, crippled in finances, troubled by internal discord, decreasing in class attendance, suffering from the keen competition of wealthy sister colleges, can afford to alienate any considerable body of her alumni and friends, from whom alone aid must come to replenish her treasury and to keep up her numbers; and yet, if we are not mistaken, the present policy in retaining President Bartlett is gradually bringing on these results. It is not alone in Boston, Springfield, Manchester and New York city that expressions of this nature are heard among her alumni, but also in the West - in Chicago, St. Louis and Minneapolis. It is easier to tear down than to build up; easier to turn aside to other institutions the current of students and means than to set it back in the old channel. No one man or set of men ought to hazard so much of importance to the college for the sake of personal aggrandizement or the brief life of any party policy.

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