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Of the many symptoms of imbecility often shown by the authorities of some colleges, none has ever struck the writer as so indicative of narrow-mindedness and intellectual cowardice as the recent action of the Bowdoin College faculty, which ordered the librarian to drop the North American Review from the list of periodicals taken by the college library, because the managers of that monthly see fit to continue to publish Col. Ingersoll's articles, and have, it is said, refused to grant to Mr. Jere Black space for more answers. The last number containing a paper from Col. Ingersoll, thought to be unfit for youths of tender minds to read, is kept securely locked up. "This course of action," says the last Orient, "in regard to the library, may commend itself to 'the powers that be,' but we venture to state that it certainly will never be endorsed by the greater part of the students in whose interests the library ought to be run." The absurdity of such conduct on the part of an institution that desires to be classed among the first schools of America, that boasts of its willingness to aid its pupils in the free and fearless discussion of all the problems that now occupy the attention of the learned world, cannot fail to bring home well-deserved derision and contempt to the fossil representatives of a past age and society.

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