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While You Were Away

Summer 1985

Friday

172 193

21 South Africa

President Bok and six other Ivy League College presidents met with the Rev. Jesse Jackson and agreed to throw their personal support behind legislation imposing economic sanctions on the South African government. Officials said after the closed door meeting at Columbia University that the presidents will join Bok in demonstrating personal support for such sanctions as the bill forwarded by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.).

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Saturday

175 190

24 Miles Ahead

Margaret R. Miles, a historical theologian, was named the first tenured woman in the 170-year history of the Divinity School. Miles, who has taught there since 1978, is highly regarded for her groundbreaking work on early church history and theological gender studies. The appointment of Miles is the first of seven lifetime teaching appointments scheduled over the next few years, as the school is in the midst of an unprecedented faculty turnover.

176 189

25 Cashing In

James I. Cash Jr., an expert on corporate computer use, became the first Black tenured professor at the Business School. Cash, 38, who also has been active in attracting minorities to the B-School, was instrumental in helping to expand the use of computers in the B-School's MBA program.

177 188

26 Wally, You're Back

For only the second time in his career, Nobel Prize-winning biochemist Walter Gilbert '53 has been given a lifetime teaching post at Harvard. The recombitant DNA specialist left the University in 1980 after winning the Nobel Prize to become chief operating officer at Biogen, a Cambridge-based biotechnology firm which he helped found in 1979.

Although Biogen officials said that his departure was not related to the company's finances, there have reportedly been concerns at the board level about the corporation's 1984 financial losses, estimated by analysts at about $14 million.

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