Sections

Advertisement

No Headline

The association with men of superior intelligence and experience is one of the most desirable things of a college course. In past years the relations of student and instructor was far from cordial or pleasant; they both looked upon one another as something to be avoided, and seemed to think that their desires and purposes were completely opposed. "Progress," as Chuzzlewit's friend says, "has to a great extent removed this erroneous idea." Year by year student and teacher have continued to make advances toward each other, until they have now come to regard one another as valued friends, from whom much can be gained in the social intercourse out of the class-room. Especially is this true in the case of the younger instructors, in whom the remembrance of the trials and discouragements that often beset a man at college, is still sufficiently alive to enable them to appreciate the value of friendly advice and cheering support. The result of this is to inspire in men a greater interest in their own welfare, they know that others are active in assisting their success; they acquire increased confidence in their capabilities, and a self-reliance and determination that are only too often lost in the many anxieties of college life.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement