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Many remarks have been made lately concerning the apparent change of tone in the Boston papers toward Harvard students. Last year they were wont to treat every little, thoughtless act with the utmost severity, as if it were premeditated, and were intended to shake the peace of the Commonwealth to its very foundation. Last year the freak of the freshmen at Oscar Wilde's lecture would have made the subject of editorials of the bitterest kind, denouncing not only the sixty "bold, bad men," but also the whole college. They now pass lightly over what last year would have been a good subject for the indignant utterances of the editorial pen, and even say that the freshmen did a good thing. This change is as marvellous as it is sudden. The cause of it remains, and always will remain an enigma. We would have as soon expected to see the Globe or the Post warmly advocating the "grand old principles of the Republican party," as to see the Boston papers treat the actions of Harvard students with leniency, or even fairness. Can it be that the child-like, modest, and unassuming simplicity of '85 has infected the spirits of Boston's reporters? It must be so, or else the enigma must still remain unsolved.

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