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THE COLLEGE WORLD.

A Woman's Medical College has been instituted in Baltimore.

W. F. Corey, of Worcester, will train the Dartmouth Nine. The five songs of Dartmouth for the new book have been chosen and sent to the publisher.

President Arthur is a graduate of Union College. He has promised to attend their next commencement, if possible.

There is some diversity of opinion at Yale as to the advantages of steam-heating in the college buildings. Since its introduction into some of the dormitories, enough time has elapsed to destroy all remembrance of former suffering and discomfort from cold rooms, in the minds of many occupants; and, consequently, complaints are beginning to be made of some minor discomforts and inconveniences arising from steam-heating. Complaint is made of the noise; and one Yale man writes: "They frequently leak all over the carpet, and they don't give the look of comfort to a room which a fire does. But the plan has its advantages: A room can be heated in a very short time, and the temperature regulated easily, though I have always noticed that the rooms heated in this way are very hot and close." Nevertheless, we will venture to assert that no one who had endured the rigors of minus zero degrees in e. g. Weld, would ever venture to raise such objections if steam were to be introduced into our buildings. On the question of the desirability of steam-heat for dwellings in the outer world, there is almost no doubt at all. Steam is fast coming to supercede all other methods of heating; and, if a practically scientific method of steam-heating were adopted for Harvard's dormitories, there need be no occurrence of the disagreeable symptoms of leakage and noise. Moreover, the pleasant appearance and advantages for ventilation of open fire-places need not be lost. There would be no occasion for removing them from the buildings.

There appears to be considerable anxiety over the question of fire-escape apparatus for dormitories at Princeton and Yale. The last Princetonian had a satirical report of the burning of a college dormitory and attendant loss of life from insufficient means of escape for the inmates of the building. The Record also has lately been agitating this question; and now we learn from the Yale News that, "In each entry of Durfee one of the upmost story rooms is to be provided on the Elm-street side with a suitably attached knotted rope long enough to reach the ground. In each of the old buildings and in Farnam much the same contrivance is to be adopted in each entry, the rope, however, being attached at the highest of the hallway. In the old chapel an iron ladder is to be permanently attached in the rear, reaching from the window of the room in the gable to the sill of the blind window about eight feet above the ground. These fire-escapes are to be placed in position soon." Meanwhile Harvard is left to the saving grace of the Cambridge fire department (vide Lampoon) and of hypothetical fire ladders stowed away in unknown biding-places.

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