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NOTES AND COMMENTS.

The Yale Record charges Harvard with copying the Yale cheer.

The Williams Athenaeum has come out as an illustrated bi-weekly.

A large party from Lasell Seminary visited the college yesterday.

The Hebrew examination has been postponed from June 9th to the 16th, at the same hour.

Mr. Darwin left an autobiography behind. Among his papers was found a life of his father.

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The Yale Record, speaking of the careful training of their crew says: "Under such constant and thorough coaching, the men can hardly fail to become almost perfect oarsmen by the day of the race, and indeed their work already appears to us better than that of any crew that we have ever seen here."

There were seven thousand spectators at the Yale-Princeton game in New York on Decoration Day. The N. Y. Herald in commenting on the game, says: "The contest as a whole was but little in advance of the amateur playing of twenty years ago, and in striking contrast to the splendid exhibition on the same field the day before."

News comes from China that Yung Wing, of Hartford, has been received by Li Hung Chang, who listened attentively to his appeals for the return of the Chinese students to schools in Connecticut. Yung Wing is now on his way to Peking, where he will pursue his application. He expresses hope that thirty or forty may be allowed to return and resume their studies.

"It must be an astonishing reflection to the younger generation of Englishmen that the famous university men of fifty years ago, whom they constantly hear praised, had not the smallest tincture of science, The Oxford men - Newman, Manning and Arnold - knew nothing of it. The Cambridge man, Darwin, when at school, which was a principal feeder of Cambridge, heard his pursuits described by the head master as the cultivation of 'stinks' - which, indeed, became the popular university term for them." - [St. James' Gazette.

In a letter to the N. Y. Times, T. W. Ludlow writes: "The cordial co-operation of so many of our principal colleges in the foundation of the American school to be opened at Athens next autumn, is a matter of great satisfaction both to the school committee and to the Archaeological Institute. This co-operation seems to indicate a feeling of mutual fellowship and sympathy, which is, perhaps, of recent growth among our institutions of higher learning - a feeling which cannot but bear good fruit in the future. Although the membership of the institute has increased largely throughout the country during the past year, and now approaches three hundred, a further increase is desired to render possible the most energetic prosecution of its work."

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