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EDITORS HARVARD HERALD : It seems indeed strange that a Boston paper should first call attention to Harvard's lack of patriotism in not observing Memorial Day, and stranger still would it be if in future years the day is not more fitly observed. Many Harvard men, no doubt, would gladly spend the little time and money required to decorate, once a year, the building which commemorates at once the patriotism of the dead and the generosity of the living. Most Harvard men (especially the faculty) do not think that "the recognition of the dead soldiers of the Civil War of Harvard University ended the day that the hall was dedicated." The dedication of Memorial Hall was but the beginning of Harvard's recognition. Today as the student passes the marble slabs in the transept of Memorial, his imagination carries him to where the sons of his own Alma Mater lie buried in a Southern graveyard, and he is thankful that Harvard, together with all other institutions of learning in our land, still flourishes and that war is no more. Then he thinks of those who helped to make the present state of prosperity possible. Thus it is that patriotism is inculcated at Harvard, not in one but in every day of the year. We think, however, that it would show our patriotism more plainly to the stranger if Harvard observed Memorial Day as a holiday. To have all the marble tablets in the transept decked with evergreen would symbolize the undying memory with which the Alma Mater will always clothe her sons. Moreover it would be but right when paying our tributes to the dead warriors to remember those sons of Harvard who spoke eloquently in favor of peace. Among these illustrious sons of Harvard whom we think should be remembered every Memorial Day none have earned more gratitude and love than Charles Sumner.

X. Y.

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