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The power of perseverance, or even of pertinacity, in college studies, as in every thing else, must be acknowledged to be of the greatest value. The fact is frequently remarked that students who have given the most brilliant promises of future success in preparatory schools frequently take but a mediocre rank in college. While the saying is trite that high rank in the freshman year often means but a subordinate position at graduation, on the other hand it is almost a college tradition that the man who ranks high in the later years of his course usually stands in the lower or middle section of his class in his earlier years at college, principally, we presume, because the rise or decline of a student in such cases is as a matter of course very marked. It must be admitted, we think, that here the power of perseverance comes most into play in insuring continued success. The old story of undue precocity partly explains the phenomenon. The gradual oncoming of a certain blase spirit, resulting from the weariness of overforced mental activity, is remarkable in many cases. With some, college is the limit of mental growth; with many, but the beginning. There are many consolations for the ambitious but temporarily unsuccessful in all these facts of our daily observation, as well as in the more commonplace truism as to the college standing of famous men.

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